Publications

Dust & Shadow Reader vol. 1

A commonplace book about living in the desert. The Dust & Shadow Readers are self-published collections of writings and bibliographic wandering designed to accompany our speculative experiments with the Laboratory for Critical Technics in and around the deserts of Arizona.

Type: Book
Year: 2018
Authors: Stacey Moran, Adam Nocek, Nik Gaffney, Maja Kuzmanovic, Ron Broglio
Attachment: Dust and Shadow Reader vol. 1

Data collection and storage in long-term ecological and evolutionary studies: The Mongoose 2000 system

We describe a system we have developed called Mongoose 2000 for the study of multiple individuals in the wild over many years.

Type: Journal Article
Year: 2018
Authors: Dave Griffiths, Amber Griffiths

Sonic Kayaks: Environmental monitoring and experimental music by citizens

The Sonic Kayak is a musical instrument used to investigate nature and developed during open hacklab events. The kayaks are rigged with underwater environmental sensors, which allow paddlers to hear real-time water temperature sonifications and underwater sounds, generating live music from the marine world. Sensor data is also logged every second with location, time and date, which allows for fine-scale mapping of water temperatures and underwater noise that was previously unattainable using standard research equipment. The system can be used as a citizen science data collection device, research equipment for professional scientists, or a sound art installation in its own right.

Type: Journal Article
Year: 2017
Authors: Dave Griffiths, Amber Griffiths, Kaffe Matthews

La science n'est pas réservée aux scientifiques (professionnels)

[FR] Visitons ensemble un espace partagé où des citoyens développent par eux-mêmes les techniques nécessaires à leur vie quotidienne.

[EN] Let's visit a shared space were citizens develop technologies supporting their daily life by themselves.

Type: Web Article
Year: 2017
Author: Michka Melo
Attachment: La science n’est pas réservée aux scientifiques

Textility of Code: A Catalogue of Errors

This article presents a series of informal experiments in software and weaving, most of which were conducted as part of the Weaving Codes, Coding Weaves project. Different aspects of weaving, including plain weave, a four-shaft loom, tablet weaving and warp-weighted weaving are simulated, in order to gain greater understanding of the craft from the perspective of computer science. The production rules of L-Systems are employed to begin to explore the expansive possibilities offered even by our simple simulations. In order to test our models and gain deeper understanding, the languages we produce are interpreted both as computer simulations and by our human selves, through the weaving of textile by hand. Physical user interfaces are introduced, in order to help communicate the structures and thought processes of weaving. Finally, we share our approach to representing a weave from the point of view of a thread. Throughout, our aim is not to simulate a weave in its entirety, but to gain and share insights into its complexity, and begin see how the long history of weaving, as a fundamentally digital yet ancient craft, can inform the younger fields of computer science and engineering.

Type: Journal Article
Year: 2017
Authors: Dave Griffiths, Alex McLean

Coding with Knots

In this paper we explore new ways to approach understanding of the mysterious Precolumbian quipus, using both visual and sonic interpretations. We base our investigation on the Harvard Quipu Archive, starting with graphical visualisation techniques that give us an overall view so we can compare textile structures and perform basic cryptanalysis. We use listening and sonification in order to filter and compare the different modes of data representation (knot type, colour, twist and material). This provides new ways to explore both currently understood and unknown patterns of meaning in quipus.

Type: Journal Article
Year: 2017
Authors: Dave Griffiths, Julian Rohrhuber

FoAM has left the building...

A memoir of 'The Great Ephemeralisation of FoAM bxl', a conscious closure of 14 years of FoAM's studio on Koolmijnenkaai in Brussels.

Type: Web Article
Year: 2017
Author: Maja Kuzmanovic

Population genetic structure in European lobsters: implications for connectivity, diversity and hatchery stocking

In this paper we use genetics to see if lobsters form separate populations around the coast of Cornwall in the UK. This information is useful for conservation organisations which release hatchery reared young lobsters into the wild in an effort to replenish lobster numbers. If separate populations exist, they would need to be much more careful when choosing release sites. This research contributes towards evidence-based policy that is essential for improving the sustainability of fisheries.

Type: Journal Article
Year: 2017
Author: Amber Griffiths

A Lab Approach for Marine CoLABoration

Improving the health of the ocean is one of the urgent, complex problems of our time. The threats to the marine environment and by extension to human wellbeing are too entangled for simple single-issue solutions. Another approach is to observe and interact with the ocean from multiple perspectives, to imagine, experiment and learn from failure. This is the essence of the "lab approach" – enabling accelerated systemic innovation while reducing risk. While there are many different types of labs, most share a few key aspects. Labs conduct experiments. Labs foster emergence. Labs evolve through collaborative creation and peer learning. Labs cultivate unique mindsets, values and cultures.

Type: Web Article
Year: 2017
Authors: Nik Gaffney, Maja Kuzmanovic

An ecological role for assortative mating under infection?

Wildlife diseases are emerging at a higher rate than ever before meaning that understanding their potential impacts is essential, especially for those species and populations that may already be of conservation concern.

Type: Journal Article
Year: 2017
Author: Amber Griffiths